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call for abstracts / papers

Ceci est une fake news; Hrag Vartanian 2017 CC BY-ND 2.0 via flickr.com

Hrag Vartanian 2017 CC BY-ND 2.0 via flickr.com

The call for papers for the upcoming 6th volume in European Integration and Democracy series, devoted to challenges for democracy, the rule of law and the respect for fundamental rights, posed by contemporary disinformation practices and digital media, has now been published [PDF 247 KB].

The planned book is a joint endeavour of the Centre for Direct Democracy Studies (CDDS) at the Faculty of Law of the University of Białystok, Poland, the Research Group on Law, Science, Technology and Society (LSTS) at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Belgium and the Department of Media and Communication of Erasmus University Rotterdam (EUR), the Netherlands. The book will be published by Intersentia in mid-2019 under co-editorship of Elżbieta Kużelewska (CDDS), Georgios Terzis (VUB), Daniel Trottier (EUR) and Dariusz Kloza (VUB-LSTS).

This book is motivated, to a large extent, by the recent developments in information, misinformation and disinformation practices. From the beginning of history, various and diverse means or channels of communication have been employed to inform, misinform (unintentionally) and disinform (deliberately); the book will focus mainly on the last of these practices, frequently labelled ‘fake news’. Yet, in recent decades, the emergence and progress of new information and communications technologies (ICT), combined with the ever more increasing digitalisation and globalisation of almost every aspect of modern life, have opened new and uncharted avenues to that end. The 2016 referendum on the departure of the United Kingdom from the European Union (the so-called ‘Brexit’) and the presidential elections in the United States – and related, alleged disinformation practices – are perhaps the strongest reminder of the importance and power of disinformation in society. These developments, in turn, bring about profound ramifications for the very existence and functioning of a democratic polity. In particular, they affect the values and principles on which the European integration project as well as many other Western democratic polities have been built: human dignity, freedom, democracy, equality, the rule of law (Rechtsstaat) and respect for human rights, among others. These democratic polities are only at an early stage of understanding the implications of disinformation practices and digital media. Therefore, the relations between democracy and these practices merit critical analysis and academic attention.

The book will take a broad, interdisciplinary perspective, analysing the subject-matter from the diverse viewpoints of philosophy, ethics, law, history, political science, economy, business management, sociology, psychology, geography, linguistics, computer science, journalism and media studies, science and technology studies (STS), among others. In addition, comparative analyses are strongly encouraged.

The deadline for submitting an extended abstract is 30 June 2018 and, upon acceptance, full submissions will be due by 15 October 2018.

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pic by dean hochman (@flickr)

In the context of the upcoming PRINTEGER European Conference on Research Integrity: Why Research Integrity Matters to You has been opened a call for papers on the themes of research integrity and scientific misconduct. The Conference, organised by the Promoting Integrity as an Integral Dimension of Excellence in Research (PRINTEGER) project, will take place between the 5th and 7th February 2018 in Bonn. The deadline for submissions has been extended, and is now 15 October 2017. All useful details can be found here.

 

PLSCWe are excited to announce that LSTS is organizing the third edition of the PLSC-Europe in collaboration with Privacy Salon. Based on the popular Privacy Law Scholars Conference (PLSC) event in the United States, PLSC-Europe is dedicated to bringing together privacy law scholars, practitioners, and privacy scholars from other disciplines from across Europe and beyond to discuss current issues. PLSC-Europe aims at fostering greater connections between academia and practice (industry, legal, advocacy, and government), and at bringing together law scholars with academics and professionals from other disciplines (e.g. economics, philosophy, political science, computer science). The first PLSC-Europe was held in October 2015 in conjunction with the Amsterdam Privacy Conference, and the second one in May 2017, in conjunction with TILTing Perspectives 2017. From 2017 onwards, PLSC-Europe became a regular event co-organized by the University of Amsterdam (IvIR), Tilburg University (TILT), and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (LSTS/Privacy Salon), alternating between Amsterdam, Tilburg, and Brussels. PLSC-Europe 2018 will take place in Brussels on 27 January 2018 and will be held in conjunction with the Computers, Privacy & Data Protection (CPDP) conference. The call for papers for PLSC-Europe 2018 can be found here.

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picture by tinkerlog (@flickr)

The Call for Papers for the fifth annual London Conference in Critical Thought (LCCT), to be hosted by the Birkbeck Department of Law on 24 and 25 June 2016, has now been published. The Conference is composed of different thematic streams, such as ‘Data as Things: Dis/assembling the Stuff of Data and Data’s Coming to Matter’, jointly organised by Claudia Aradau, Rocco Bellanova and Gloria González Fuster and inviting participants to apprehend data as an object of inquiry and a matter of concern. Submissions should be received by the 28th March 2016. More information can be found at the LCCT2016 website and in the LCCT2016 Call for Papers.

 

 

photo: (c) keepcalm-o-matic.co.uk

It is our great pleasure to announce that on 26 January 2016 the VUB-LSTS will be hosting the 10th-anniversarity edition International Conference on the Interaction of Knowledge Rights, Data Protection and Communication KnowRight 2016.

KnowRight conferences have been held since 1995; KnowRight 2016 is already the 10th. It will focus on the interaction between data protection, intellectual property rights, ethical issues, civil society and information technology. Due to its origins as an Intellectual Property (IP) and privacy conference of a computing society, technological solutions to legal challenges are a main aim.

KnowRight is a platform between business, civil society and administration organised and mediated by academia, for discussing and finding solutions on the new challenges for rights on information and knowledge, taking into account new technologies in the context of the Knowledge and Network Society and a progressively digital market and environment. The main topic of KnowRight2016 is: Data Protection in Practice.

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DSC_7983edCredAntonin Margier (Université de Lille 1) and Lucas Melgaço (LSTS, VUB) have launched a call for articles for a themed issues of Urban Environment (2016):

Today, the ‘right to the city’ has become a key concept, a motto, in both academic circles and in social movements and public policies. The so-called accessibility of the city for all has become a fundamental concern to institutions dealing with citizens’ movements that reclaim urban space. In developing the concept of the ‘right to the city’, Lefebvre (1968) referred to a reappropriation of the decision process and the city’s production facilities by its inhabitants. The affirmation and participation of citizens in the future of the city should reduce the gaps between citizens, should limit segregation and foster the emergence of a more inclusive and democratic city.

Now, more than 40 years after the publication of the ‘Right to the City’, it is clear that inequalities, conflicts and injustices in public spaces have not declined. An important part of the global urban population, north and south, continues to be sidelined for urban amenities. Logics of enclosure and exclusivity (Donzelot, 2004) tend to direct the production of the urban into a multitude of enclaves, classifying individuals according to their social status. Some minorities have ever less access to public spaces, whether they are the homeless (Smith, 1996; Mitchell, 1997), street vendors (Crossa, 2009), prostitutes (Hubbard, 2004) or youth (Malone, 2002). Moreover, the idea of being a citizen has made way for that of being a consumer, as pointed out by Santos (1987).

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surveillance246The Call for Papers for the 2016 edition of the Computers, Privacy and Data Protection Conference (CPDP), titled[In]visibilities & Infrastructures is currently open and will close on 1st October 2015. The CPDP Scientific Committee invites papers in law, social sciences, philosophy and computer sciences, and any other relevant fields. Multidisciplinary papers are particularly welcome. This call aims to reach researchers whose works relate to new technologies, privacy and data protection. Check the full call for papers here.