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Monthly Archives: September 2017

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pic by Myxi (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

How to find cool online games that respect your digital rights? Where to look for them? How to recognise them? Which are the best ones? And how do you make sure nobody is stealing your data while you are at it? ‘How to Find (Decent) Privacy-Friendly Games Online? Strategies for Cool Families’ is A Privacy & Cake ‘Bring Your Own Device & Child’ Workshop that will unlock all these questions, hoping somebody will kindly help us to answer them.  It will take place on Saturday 7 October 2017 from 14:15–15:30, in a session promoted by LSTS and Privacy Salon the context of Freedom Not Fear event, and will be animated by Gloria González Fuster and Rosamunde Van Brakel. Please note that this workshop welcomes children who love to play, parents who love their children and their privacy, volunteers bringing cake, family and friends in general and especially suggestions for games, tools and ideas on how to find the best privacy-friendly games on line.

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pic by dean hochman (@flickr)

In the context of the upcoming PRINTEGER European Conference on Research Integrity: Why Research Integrity Matters to You has been opened a call for papers on the themes of research integrity and scientific misconduct. The Conference, organised by the Promoting Integrity as an Integral Dimension of Excellence in Research (PRINTEGER) project, will take place between the 5th and 7th February 2018 in Bonn. The deadline for submissions has been extended, and is now 15 October 2017. All useful details can be found here.

 

GroundsThe book ‘Grounds of the Immaterial. A Conflict-Based Approach to Intellectual Rights’ has been published by Edward Elgar Publishing. Written By Niels van Dijk, the book applies a novel conflict-based approach to the notions of ‘idea’, ‘concept’, ‘invention’ and ‘immateriality’ in the legal regime of intellectual property rights by turning to the adversarial legal practices in which they occur. In doing so, it provides extensive ethnographies of the courts and law firms, and tackles classical questions in legal doctrine about the immaterial nature of intellectual property rights from a thoroughly new perspective. More information can be found here.