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reinventingdataprotection

‘CPDP’ 2007

As the Computers, Privacy and Data Protection (CPDP) Conference is about to celebrate its 10th birthday, we look back at 10 years of CPDP programmes and their covers.

It all started in October 2007 with the brochure of the ‘Reinventing Data Protection?’ International Conference, which took place in October 2007 at deBuren, in Brussels. The orginal handout mixed a photocopied hand and a barcode, a simple yet effective combination producing a sort of modern allegory of human beings in modern societies, difficult to surpass.

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CPDP 2009

Perhaps fearing that indeed such a telling image was impossible to surpass, in 2009 the Conference came back with a handout with almost exactly the same picture. Continuity was also guaranteed by the fact that the event was again held in deBuren, and also came with an interrogative title: ‘Data Protection in A Profiled World?’, the Conference wondered.  The gathering had already adopted what was to become its official name, Computers, Privacy and Data Protection International Conference,  and this time it took place in January, which was to eventually become the CPDP month for many years. The repeated cover picture did have some negative effects, notably generating a certain degree of anxiety among those who were distributing it, as they were never sure they were distributing the right one.

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CPDP 2010

By its third edition, in 2010, CPDP continued to search for its marks and started to be celebrated on the week of the Data Protection Day, also known as Data Privacy Day, which is the 28th January as many data subjects know. This time the event came with a very assertive title: ‘An Element of Choice’, proclaimed the programme, and the cover picture saw a person comfortably floating over a multimedia sea. Exceptionally, the event was organised at the Kaaitheater.

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CPDP 2011

The 2011 programme made a clin d’oeil to the original edition by bringing back a hand, although this time not photocopied but X-rayed and holding a mouse, and now against a white background. 2011 was the year CPDP moved to Les Halles de Schaerbeek, and also the year that the Conference started to have an official duration of three days. The title of the 4th edition pondered: ‘European Data Protection: In Good Health?’.

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CPDP 2012

The white background started to become recurrent with the 5th edition, in 2012. By then, optimism appeared to be in the air, in light of the confident title: ‘European Data Protection: Coming of Age’. The cover leaned towards abstraction with a close up of a fragment of a sandglass, possibly hinting somehow that coming of age takes time.

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CPDP 2013

In 2013, the 6th CPDP edition opted for an even closer relation between message and image, illustrating that it was all about ‘Reloading Data Protection’ with a half-loaded battery. The novelty of having an almost solid blue background was compensated by the reassuring way in which the ‘reloading data protection‘ reverberated the primal ‘reinventing data protection?’ mantra.

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CPDP 2014

Not about re-inventing or re-loading data protection but about re-forming it was the 7th edition of CPDP in 2014. That year the Conference was titled ‘Reforming Data Protection: The Global Perspective’, and the illustration emphasised the importance of this global perspective with a globe where countries were depicted in different shades of blue, reigning over a white background.

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CPDP 2015

Abstraction was the keyword in 2015, when the idea of ‘Data Protection on the Move’ that guided the 8th edition of CPDP was graphically encapsulated by a blurry image of what could be imagined to be data, dynamically going in all directions against a black space, for reinforced dramatic effect.

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CPDP 2016

Magritte was one of the main sources of inspiration for CPDP 2016‘s graphics: a bowler hat and suit were worn by a data network-like (almost) invisible man, against the by then already classical white background. The image appropratetly reverberated the 9th edition title, concerned with ‘Invisibilities & Infrastructures’.

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CPDP 2017

Finally, this years’ CPDP comes with the promising slogan ‘The Age of Intelligent Machines’, accompanied by an exclusive drawing  signed by Rayman and based on an idea by Dara Hallinan. All quintessential elements of a good CPDP programme cover are thus there, announcing a great 10th edition.

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dreams_rewired_radio-toy300dpi In the context of the Computers, Privacy and Data Protection (CPDP) 2017 Conference will be screened the film ‘Dreams Rewired‘, by Manu Luksch, Martin Reinhart and Thomas Tode. Originally titled ‘Mobilisierung der Träume’, the film explores through a montage of films from the 1880s to the 1930s how cinema echoed ancient fears that the telephone or telivision would change us forever. The screening will take place on 27 January 2017, at 20:30, at Les Halles de Schaerbeek. For more information and to register please visit the CPDP website (scroll down for details).

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picture by g. gonzález fuster

The Computers, Privacy and Data Protection (CPDP) will celebrate its 10th birthday under the title ‘The Age of Intelligent Machines‘. CPDP2017 will take place between the 25 and 27 January 2017 at the Halles de Schaerbeek, in Brussels, bringing together many speakers and surrounded by numerous side events. Check the full programme here, and the side events here. To register, it is here.

privacytopia_binary The Privacytopia Binary art exhibition can be visited from 13 to 29 January 2017 in De Markten. Presenting ‘Search Machine’ by The Museum and ‘Webcam Venus & brbxoxo‘, by Addie Wagenknecht & Pablo Garcia”, the exhibition is organised by the Privacy Salon together with Bogomir Doringer, in partnership with CPDP2017 and De Markten. The vernissage will take place on Friday 13 January 2017 at 7 pm. Location: De Markten, Oude Graanmarkt 5 Rue du Vieux Marché aux Grains, 1000 Brussels. Entrance is free.